getGeoIPCountryCode = SiteAppCode = LB_EN Test : 'LB_EN/'

OK

OKCancel

Thank you

Close

Can foods cause acne?

  • favoris

The relationship between acne and diet is often misunderstood. We explore if there are types of food that can increase the prevalence of acne and how this occurs.

Foods that can lead to breakouts


While your dietary choices don’t determine whether or not your skin suffers from acne, they do have the ability to exacerbate pimples, breakouts, oily skin or a preexisting acne condition[1]. As acne affects the skin’s oil glands, it makes sense to cut down on foods that cause overstimulation of these glands, in order to reduce the signs of acne. It may be worth changing your eating habits to find if any other foods impact the severity of your acne.


As acne affects the skin’s oil glands, it makes sense to cut down on foods that cause overstimulation of these glands, in order to reduce the signs of acne.

Certain foods are proven to increase acne prevalence and severity.
hen consumed they cause a spike in blood sugar which can cause inflammation, while increasing insulin levels.
This encourages the production of sebum and thus can cause a breakout.

High-glycemic index foods that break down quickly in the body, such as white bread, processed breakfast cereals, white rice, pretzels, potato chips, cookies and cakes can increase the severity of an acne outbreak[2].


Foods that can trigger sebum:

  • White bread
  • Processed breakfast cereals
  • White rice
  • Pretzels
  • Potato chips
  • Cookies
  • Cakes
  • Milk

Milk has been identified as having a similar effect on the body as high-glycemic index foods, as it often comes from pregnant cows, and contains hormones that can trigger the production of sebum[3]. Growth hormones found in milk can encourage a proliferation of skin cells, which can lead to clogged pores[4]. Try cutting down on your milk intake, and consider taking a calcium supplement or incorporating more calcium rich food such as orange juice, soy milk, tofu, almonds, spinach, and broccoli into your diet[5].

There are certain so-called ‘healthy foods’ that have also been suggested to contribute to outbreaks of acne. Low fat or fat-free products like fat-free yogurt or low fat cheese often contain added sugar to supplement the taste, and can therefore cause inflammation[6].
In addition, juice and smoothies are often high in sugar and low in fiber, which spikes sebum production, making whole fruit is a better choice.

Contrary to popular belief, alcohol, chocolate and greasy food do not explicitly cause acne, and there is no proof that they increase its appearance[7].
However regular consumption of alcohol can repress the immune system, limiting the body’s ability to fight the bacteria and infection that may lead to acne blemishes.

Foods that can help lessen the signs of acne


Eating foods that are low glycemic index - most vegetables, whole grains and most fruits - can help to reduce skin oils, as they contain beta-carotenes in addition to their anti-inflammatory properties. Dark leafy greens like spinach can help to clear impurities from the body, which if left uncleared, can encourage acne. For omega-3 fatty acids, which lessen inflammation, try salmon, sardines, walnuts and flaxseed[8]. Green tea and berries are filled with antioxidants, which have anti-inflammatory properties. Probiotics found in yogurt, sauerkraut, dark chocolate, pickles, kimchi and kombucha tea reduce inflammation in the gut, and can contribute to a clearer complexion.

[1] Kucharska, A. et al, 'Significance of diet in treated and untreated acne vulgaris' in Postepy Dermatology Allergology 33.2 (2016) pp. 81-86 [Accessible at:https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4884775/]
[2] Katta, R. et al, 'Diet and Dermatology: The Role of Dietary Intervention in Skin Disease' in The Journal of Clinical and Aesthetic Dermatology7.7 (2014) pp. 46-51 [Accessibe at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4106357/]
[3] Katta, R. et al, 'Diet and Dermatology: The Role of Dietary Intervention in Skin Disease' in The Journal of Clinical and Aesthetic Dermatology7.7 (2014) pp. 46-51 [Accessibe at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4106357/]
[4] Pappas, A. 'The relationship of diet and acne' in Dermato Endocrinology 1.5 (2009) pp. 262-267 [Accessible at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2836431/]
[5] Ross, A.C. ‘Dietary Reference Intakes for Calcium and Vitamin D in Institute of Medicine (US) Committee to Review Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin D and Calcium’ (2011) [Accessible at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK56060/]
[6] Katta, R. et al, 'Diet and acne: an exploratory survey study of patient beliefs' in Dermatology Practical & Conceptual 6.2 (2016) pp. 21-27 [Accessible at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4866623/]
[7] Kucharska, A. et al, 'Significance of diet in treated and untreated acne vulgaris' in Postepy Dermatology Allergology 33.2 (2016) pp. 81-86 [Accessible at:https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4884775/]
[8] Pappas, A, 'The relationship of diet and acne' in Dermato Endocrinology 1.5 (2009) pp. 262-267 [Accessible at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2836431/]

Our iconic products

  • 23462Fortifying and plumping daily booster58NewMINERAL 89FACE CAREDay creamMoisturising

    New

    Fortifying and plumping daily booster

    MINERAL 89

    Fortifying and plumping daily booster

    Day cream

    INNOVATION: your skin daily dose of strength

  • 17624BEAUTYFYING ANTI-BLEMISH CARE 24H HYDRATION
    41Best SellerNORMADERMAnti-imperfection
    BEAUTYFYING ANTI-BLEMISH CARE 24H HYDRATION
  • Most read

    Life Style

    Staying fit: how to take care of your skin post-workout

    While exercise is essential to maintaining a balanced lifestyle and healthy, vibrant skin, it’s important that we remember to replenish our body’s mineral levels post-workout. Find out how to maximize the skin-boosting effects of your regular gym session for a gorgeous glow that doesn’t fade.

    read the article

    Life moments

    3 ways to fight thinning hair after 40

    If you’ve noticed that your hair has become thinner in the last few years, you’re not alone. Damage linked to styling, age and hormonal changes often lead to finer or weaker hair as we approach our forties, but there are a few key changes you can make to reduce the visible impact.

    read the article

    go to top